Our logo, spray-painted on our wall while we build out our space

Our logo, spray-painted on our wall while we build out our space

The original poster from 1974, by Sheila Levrant de Bretteville

The original poster from 1974, by Sheila Levrant de Bretteville

The Eyebolt

In 1974, Sheila Levrant de Bretteville designed a poster for an event at the Los Angeles-based Woman's Building titled, "Women in design: the next decade: a conference for women who work with public visual and physical forms" held at The Woman's Building in Los Angeles. On her website, Sheila writes:

 "My attraction to hardware led me to see the biological symbol of women in a simple eyebolt. I made a necklace and we decided to give keychain necklaces with eyebolt pendants to everyone who attended this conference during spring of the Woman’s Building’s second and last year in the Grandview site."

We use this eyebolt in our logo because it is a simple and powerful symbol. We use it as a reference to the work done in generations past. We use it to connect that past to the further work we hope do now and in the future.

The Woman's Building at the World's Columbian Exposition, 1893

The Woman's Building at the World's Columbian Exposition, 1893

The Woman's Building, Los Angeles, 1970 Commons credit: Maberry at English Wikipedia - Transferred from en.wikipedia to Commons., CC BY-SA 2.5, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=48249820

The Woman's Building, Los Angeles, 1970
Commons credit: Maberry at English Wikipedia - Transferred from en.wikipedia to Commons., CC BY-SA 2.5, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=48249820

The Woman's Building

The Woman's Building of the 20th century, in turn, took its name from The Woman's Building at the Chicago World's Fair of 1893. This earlier building was designed by Chilean-American architect Sophia G. Hayden, the first woman to graduate from the four-year architecture program at MIT.

The Building was hugely popular and displayed the work of women artists and craftspeople. It was also host to several congresses, attended by thousands, discussing the state of the world and of women in the world in 1893.